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Maritime security advice

With the return of the warm weather the States of Jersey Police would like to remind people about keeping their maritime property secure.
 
Historically during the summer months Jersey has suffered from crime in this particular area for example fuel and boat thefts. To combat this, patrols are to be increased over the summer period to provide advice and guidance and also to speak to those frequenting these areas to gather information about what is happening around our coastline.
 
These patrols will be conducted by both uniformed officers and specialist staff from Crime Services who also focus on the wider National Security threat.
 
Whilst there is no specific National Security threat to the Island or its residents at the present time, Jersey d"s remain vulnerable due to its geographical position and past intelligence suggests that the island has been used as a ˜stepping stone' to the UK as the first arrival point in the common travel area around Great Britain.
 
In the past, this stepping stone has been used by a wide variety of individuals from National Security interest to organised crime groups and human and drugs traffickers and the significant access to the island as afforded by its coastline is an area of business that the States of Jersey Police will be increasing its focus on in the coming months.
 
The planned checks and activities are of course in support of the significant criminal and security measures already in place at the islands official points of entry however the relatively short distance to the European mainland ensures that all Jersey harbours and coastline are susceptible to this potential threat.
 
In 2012 the States of Jersey Police, in association with Customs, produced a leaflet that asked all port users to be on the lookout for anything suspicious and these will once again be distributed throughout the summer months.
 
Amongst other matters, the leaflet asks port users to be on the look-out for:
 
 Unusual boat movements late at night or early in the morning
 People being landed at unusual locations
 Boats being moved around at night without navigation lights
 RIBS being loaded / unloaded at unusual places and
 Strangers waiting to hire boats.
 
Chief Inspector Chris Beechey, head of the Force Intelligence Bureau, said: "We would like boat owners to think about the security of their marine property in particular boat fuel and to remind them that general crime reduction advice more normally associated to their homes and car security d"s of course also refer to the maritime environment as well.
 
"Jersey continues to be a very low crime place to live and work however these simple measures will only help to enhance that situation further still.
 

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